„Texas Chainsaw Massacre” is a gruesome film for the acquired taste

Texas Chainsaw Massacre won’t be for everybody and that’s as obvious as the fact that the film’s killer wears someone else’s face in every film. But its amount of gore and elaborate death scenes may satisfy a horror/slasher/Leatherface fan.

February 22nd, 2022

The slashers’ beauty, among others, is the chaos and confusion the various franchises cause in the audience who often attempts to understand the chapters’ ultimate order and tirelessly find a deeper meaning. But the truth is—while the deeper meaning may be there, it’s not always the case nor should it be. This is why Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a great new entry into the franchise and becomes an interesting continuation filled with campiness and gore.

One may even call it a requel, as per Scream’s new horror expert, Mindy. Or I claim it to be. In David Blue Garcia’s newest film (now streaming on Netflix), Olwen Fouéré portrays Sally—a quite legendary figure and Leatherface’s only survivor from the original Tobe Hopper’s movie.

Marilyn Burns portrayed Sally in Hopper’s production. But, given Burns’ untimely death, would this be the ultimate exception, and the film is, in fact, a requel? I certainly believe so. The film is that and so much more. It strives to deliver as much gore as possible. Fede Álvarez and Rodo Sayagues, the writers of the gruesome script, ensure that we remember the elaborate death scenes.

Courtesy of Netflix

The film follows a group of friends—Ruth (Nell Hudson), Dante (Jacob Latimore), Melody (Sarah Yarkin), and her sister, Lila (Elsie Fisher), as they travel to Harlow, Texas, to execute a new business idea. Their mission is to resurrect a Texas ghost town and invite others to join them and create a new community. It sounds like a dream, especially in the contemporary life where the daily routine is going a little bit too fast.

According to the familiar plot, they have no idea they are about to encounter Leatherface (Bob Burnham), the legendary serial killer who wears a mask made out of human skin. The man seeks vengeance on the young people who, whether they intended or not, contributed to his caretaker’s death (Alice Krige).

But after the surprising arrival of the Learherface’s survivor, who seeks her own vengeance, everything turns into a bloody, absurd, and gruesome spectacle that leads to an expected yet still satisfying finale.

The level of acting is rather shadowed by everything else in the film. The script is known, predictable yet it manages to make us squirm. Sarah Yarkin and Elise Fisher as estranged sisters make a great and entertaining duo, especially in *that* bus scene. Additionally, the creators attempt to include a social commentary on the school shootings in Lila’s character and how greatly they affect the students. The matter is serious and worth discussing but it seems misplaced amongst other elements of the film.

If you’re an average viewer, it may be quite difficult to rate slasher films as such, especially when the creators focus on the visual, gruesome aspects, not the story itself. They’re not putting pressure on the character development. Instead, they focus on the villain and his revenge.

Knowing this and remembering that slashers recently tend to mock its own genre and other films that we can categorize as requels, one must realize that Texas Chainsaw Massacre values gore more than the solid narrative. The director doesn’t limit the amount of blood splattering, presenting possibly the bloodiest rage of Leatherface. It’s a spectacle filled with broken bones and countless moments of Leatherface slicing into his victims’ flesh. After the young people get involved, the rage grows and spirals out of control. You may not be expecting this much violence, so brace yourself for a wild ride.

As previously stated, slasher films revel in the over-the-top story or elements that poke fun at other creations, such as the worn-out but somehow always engaging stereotype of the killer remembering, even seeking, his first victim—the one who got away. A similar notion can be found in Texas Chainsaw Massacre. With a parallel narrative in the new installment, the creators appear to be making fun of recent Halloween sequels. Whatever it is, it’s effective and not at all disrespectful—it even further highlights the campiness of recent slashers.

However, we can only speculate as far as director’s intentions are their form of art and may not ever be known. Nonetheless, the film is a welcomed diversion from everyday life. Instead of chasing deadlines and worrying excessively, it’s sometimes nice to enjoy screaming at a bloody slasher.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre won’t be for everybody and that’s as obvious as the fact that the film’s killer wears someone else’s face in every film. But its amount of gore and elaborate death scenes may satisfy a horror/slasher/Leatherface fan.

Grade: C+

Retrospective Review: “AHS: 1984” offers an 80’s nostalgia, but lacks the “American Horror Story” vibe—And It’s Not A Bad Thing!

As a person born in the 90s, with an old soul who’s in love with Etta James or Siouxsie and The Banshees, the love for the 80s shouldn’t come as a surprise. And although 1984 lacked a specific atmosphere that the American Horror Story franchise provides, it’s not a bad thing. On the contrary—it offers something new. 

The glorious time of the 80s was not only great because of the legendary music, or eccentric clothing. It possesses its richness and interest thanks to many slasher films created at that time. Such films as Friday The 13th or I Know What You Did Last Summer inspired another season of the franchise. As a person born in the 90s, with an old soul who’s in love with Etta James or Siouxsie and The Banshees, the love for the 80s shouldn’t come as a surprise. And although Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk’s AHS:1984 lacked a specific atmosphere that the American Horror Story franchise usually provides, it’s not a bad thing. On the contrary—it offers something fresh. 

1984, California. Brooke Thompson (Emma Roberts), Montana Duke (Billie Lourd), Xavier Plympton (Cody Fern), Chet Clancy (Gus Kenworthy), and Ray Powell (DeRon Horton) meets at the dance aerobics class supervised by Montana. Shortly after, the group decides to sign up as counselors at the infamous Camp Redwood, where a gruesome massacre transpired fourteen years ago. 

As the group listens to Donna’s story (Angelica Ross) and chats by the fire, they have absolutely no idea that Mr. Jingles, aka Benjamin Richter (John Carroll Lynch), escapes an insane asylum and follows the path to his past, tightly connected with God-fearing camp owner, Margaret Booth (Leslie Grossman). At the same time, another famous serial killer travels to Camp Redwood to kill the victim that escaped him back in Los Angeles. 

The plot takes its time and, as a result, possesses a few snoozes here and there. Some scenes seem to be quite monotonous, but they prove to be beneficial for the story in the end. The narrative is cheesy, campy, and cartoonish, but it’s exactly what it’s supposed to be—a reflection of the 80s in horror, the existence and evolution of slashers and brutal serial killers. 

The season is not without stumbles, but good elements win over the flaws. The script is imaginative and enjoyable as the blood splatters everywhere and body parts fly all over the place. Nonetheless, 1984 still seems to be less bloody than, for example, Hotel or less suspenseful than Asylum

Murphy and Falchuk blend their legendary cast with new faces, creating an unusual combination. Characters are well-crafted and maintain their momentum where it’s necessary. Although the lack of the scream queen of the television or, for others, Sarah Paulson this season certainly takes its toll on the season. The character development varies from one role to another. Chet and Ray’s characters are the setting for Margaret, Nurse Rita, or Brooke, who are at the forefront of the plot. 

Leslie Grossman as Margaret Booth / FX Networks.

What easily focuses the attention is a phenomenal, hyperbolic performance of Leslie Grossman as a religious freak, Margaret Booth. Her eccentric wardrobe filled with tailor-made suits, a hairstyle like Ivana Trump, and the exaggerated statements about God will remind you of your weird aunt who comes to visit you now and then and decides to control your life for the five-hour visit span. Alongside Grossman, Angelica Ross, likewise, deserves applause. Previously known from her role in Pose, Ross’ character is a career-driven woman with an ambitious yet intriguing fixation for serial killers and their anthropology. Ross’ nurse Rita, aka Donna Chambers, would be a great conversation starter on the topic of how far you can go in the name of science and your family.

A great surprise was the role of Roberts as a shy, young Brooke Thompson. The last name is no accident; it’s a little ode for Wes Craven’s The Nightmare on Elm Street and Heather Langenkamp’s character. The role was a nice change for Roberts to play someone other than the ignorant, entitled type she’s known from, for example, in Coven or Wild Child. We also need to thank the casting team, who selected Zach Villa as a young Richard Ramirez. Both him and John Carroll Lynch did a magnificent job in the season.

The excellent, greatly written 80s nostalgia manifests itself in many different elements—neon-styled lighting and the feeling of restlessness create a perfect setting for horror and 80s fans. However, it would be nothing without a fitting soundtrack. The music tones are mostly led by Billi Idol, his White Wedding, and even more cult songs.

The season provides much fun, especially for the fans that seek nostalgia in cinema and television. That is precisely the essence of AHS: 1984—the fantastic narrative that is a return to the slasher culture and the subgenre’s birth. Although it’s not the best entry to the franchise, it’s certainly a success among the fans.

AHS: 1984 is streaming on Netflix and Hulu.