“X” Review: A Polarizing, Brutal Slasher Packed With Steamy Performances

The director goes off the chains with X in this steamy ode to the 70s about sex, mental health, and aging. Forget everything you know about the horror genre and get ready for the hottest, craziest rollercoaster that defies many taboos.

When you’re a kid, being an adult is mysterious and seemingly so cardinal. As a result, you were always curious about what the adults would talk about when discussing “grown-up” topics. Ti West’s X reminds us of this feeling and demonstrates that we don’t actually differ that much from one another, despite the many years between us. The dark urges don’t go away; in fact, they grow stronger. The director goes off the chains with X in this steamy ode to the 70s about sex, mental health, and aging. Forget everything you know about the horror genre and get ready for the hottest, craziest rollercoaster that breaks many taboos.

Rural Texas, 1970. A group of filmmakers embark on a journey to create a one-of-a-kind adult film. Especially RJ (Owen Campbell), the production’s director, believes it’s possible to make such a film with depth and he’s determined to do so. The group rents a dusty yet charming rustic cottage from the older man to shoot the film. In addition to the directors and those in charge of the setting, the group includes Lorraine (Jenna Ortega)—RJ’s girlfriend, Maxine (Mia Goth), and her partner/boss, Wayne (Martin Henderson), and the film’s main characters, Bobby-Lynne (Brittany Murphy) and Jackson Hole (Kid Cudi). As the cast and crew attempt to shoot an adult film under their hosts’ noses, the elderly couple catches them in the act. The tone quickly shifts to a brutal slaughter rife, full of naturalism and commentary on generational divides and our need for physical pleasures that only grow in adulthood.

Ti West’s story almost constantly plays on our digust, and shock to see what’s natural in such an unapologetic way. The director, known for his work on The House of the Devil, gives the genre a new twist and breaks all the taboos when in terms of lovemaking and physical pleasures. The film is sensual, enthralling, brutal, and mind-bending. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen; is for people willing to see things they have never seen before.

Jenna Ortega in X / courtesy of A24

When the main cast lacks the ability to carry the film, it’s unlikely to be a success. X’s extraordinary cast—Ortega, Goth, Snow, Campbell, Cudi, and Henderson, elevates the movie to a new level, delivering polarizing, steamy, perhaps contentious performances. Ortega and Goth stood out the most to me and shined the brightest in their strong-willed and even empowering roles. Ortega, in particular, demonstrates herself to be a fantastic scream queen for the contemporary time and audience. What began with Scream continues in X. Even though she isn’t the lead in this adult-movie-gone-brutal scenario, the actress is captivating and excels in the role.

In a way, feels like a throwback horror film and exudes big 70s vibes thanks to its killer soundtrack, editing, and cinematography. With the addition of the brutal kills and scenes that will stay with you for the rest of your life, becomes one of the most shocking films of the year, deserving of acclaim in the same way that Ti West deserves ovations for breaking so many taboos and forcing the average audience to open their minds.

Courtesy of A24

X is a vastly pleasing bloodbath in which the creators blend a groovy, liberating ambiance of the 1970s with an adult film topic, and slasher. The entire setting is deliciously composed, with every component meticulously detailed.

X could be a literal story about the production of a crazy adult movie that simply gone horribly wrong. It could also be a tale about our wants and the hypocrisy of people who judge others for their desires while harboring the same exact ones deep within themselves. Ti West makes sure that we’re thoroughly shocked, maybe even disgusted by what we see. The director highlights naturalism and thrives in it. There are no ghosts, but an ugly, dangerous truths about people and their unstoppable needs.

is not a film for the faint of heart. West’s story throws us right into the deep water, broadens our horizons, and provokes us. It’s an unforgettable film worth revisiting, with a soundtrack jam-packed with bangers and performances out of this world.

Grade: A

Author: Zofia Wijaszka

I am a Los-Angeles based film and television critic with bachelor's degree in Journalism and Social Communication with Creative Writing. I am a staff writer for First Showing, a contributing writer for AwardsWatch as well as a freelance writer for Nerdist, Film Inquiry, In Their Own League, and more. I was published at The Mary Sue, Film Threat, Reel Honey, and Polish film portals. I love the "Scream" movies, "Carol", "American Horror Story", "Schitt's Creek," and "The Haunting of Bly Manor" - pick one of these and I won't shut up about it for the next five hours. Twitter – @thefilmnerdette

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: